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Economic 

Development 

Profile 







Crawfordville 
Wakulla County 

Florida 



Economic 

Development 

Profile 



Crcwfordville 
Wakulla County 
Florida 



prepared by 

Florida Department of Commerce 
Division of Economic Development 
107 West Gaines Street 
Tallahassee, Florida 32304 



June, 1975 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



BASIC LOCATION FACTORS 1 

CRAWFORDVILLE 1 

POPULATION PROJECTIONS 1 

MANUFACTURING EMPLOYMENT 1 

EXISTING MANUFACTURERS 2 

NEW AND EXPANDED MANUFACTURERS, 1969-1974 ^3 

OTHER MAJOR EMPLOYMENT ' 3 

LABOR SUPPLY 3 

Unemployment 3 

Labor Drawing Area Map 4 

Population, Labor Drawing Area 5 

Population Trends m Wakulla and Contiguous Counties 5 

UNIONS 5 



TRANSPORTATION 5 

RAILROADS g 

TRUCK LINES 6 

AVIATION 6 

BUS SERVICE g 

PORTS e 

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SUPPORT 

SITES I '- 

INDUSTRIAL SERVICES ' 

INDUSTRIAL FINANCING ^ 

BANKING ' 

Commercial Banking ^ 

COMMUNICATIONS ' 

Telephone _ 

Telegraph _ 

ACCOMMODATIONS o 

o 

UTILITIES 9 

ELECTRIC POWER 9 

NATURAL GAS 10 

L P GAS 10 

FUEL OIL 10 

WATER 10 

Municipal Water System . . 10 

SEWERS 13 

REFUSE COLLECTION 13 



GOVERNMENT SERVICES ' 14 

GOVERNMENT 14 

TAXES 14 

FINANCE 14 

Wakulla County > 14 

Cities of Sopchoppy and St Marks 15 

FIRE PROTECTION 16 

POLICE PROTECTION 16 

AMBULANCE SERVICE 16 

PLANNING AND ZONING 16 

CONSTRUCTION CODES 16 



COMMUNITY ASSETS 17 

EDUCATION 17 

DAY CARE CENTERS 18 

LIBRARY 18 

MEDICAL AND HOSPITAL FACILITIES 18 

Hospitals 18 

Physicians and Dentists 18 

Health Department 18 

RECREATION 19 

CLIMATE 19 

HOUSING 20 

CHURCHES 20 

INCOME 20 

NEWSPAPERS 20 

RADIO AND TELEVISION 20 



RAW MATERIALS 21 

AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS 21 

FOREST RESOURCES 21 

MINERALS 21 

MARINE PRODUCTS 21 



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BASIC LOCATION FACTORS 



CRAWFORDVILLE 

Crawfordville (1974 estimated population: 1,500), county seat of Wakulla County (1974 
estimated population: 8,635), is located 20 miles south of Tallahassee and 99 miles east of 
Panama City. U.S. Highway 319 runs through Crawfordville in a north-south direction. This 
highway intersects with U.S. Highway 98, which runs in an east-west direction, approximately 
5 miles south of Crawfordville. 

Wakulla County has six other towns scattered throughout the county, two of which 
are incorporated - St. Marks (1974 estimated population: 340) and Sopchoppy (1974 esti- 
mated population: 475). The major population centers are in the southwest and extreme 
north sections of the county. 

It is estimated that 7,820 persons lived in the county's unincorporated areas in 1974. 
The unincorporated towns in addition to Crawfordville in the county include: 





1974 Estimated Population 


Medart 


600 


Newport 


200 


Panacea 


1.250 


Wakulla 


225 



POPULATION PROJECTIONS 

The University of Florida, Bureau of Economic and Business Research, has predicted 
that the population of Wakulla County will increase to 9,200 by 1980. 



MANUFACTURING EMPLOYMENT 

Manufacturing employment in Wakulla County as of June, 1974, totaled 440 persons. 
Of these, 59 percent were employed in the manufacturing of explosive powderfor ammuni- 
tion, 17 percent in petroleum refining, 11 percent in logging, and 8 percent in seafood and 
seafood processing. 

The present manufacturing labor force Is approximately 81 percent male and 19 per- 
cent female. 



y EXISTING MANUFACTURERS 
(As of January, 1975) 



Establishments Employing 5 or More Persons 



Name 

CRAWFORDVILLE 
Wakulla Wood Products 

NEWPORT 

Advanced Fiberglass 
Shipbuilders, Inc. 

PANACEA 

Barwick Brothers 

Barwick & Sons Crab 

Company 

Coastal Concrete, Inc. 

Metcalf Seafood 

Company, Inc. 

Posey Seafood & Crab 

Shelling Company 

ST. MARKS 

Clin Corporation 
Seminole Asphalt 
Refining, Inc. 



Product 



Cabinets 



Shipbuilding (commercial 
fishing boats) 



Seafood 

Seafood 
Concrete products 

Seafood 

Seafood 



Gunpowder 
Petroleum refining 



Employment 
Total Male Female 



15 



25 



19 



14 



24 



17 



20 


2 


18 


17 


16 


1 


36 


4 


32 


15 


5 


10 


360 


328 


32 


62 


59 


3 



Additional employment in Wakulla County by four digit Standard Industrial Classifi- 
cation for firms employing less than five persons includes: 



SIC Number 

2411 
2491 
2631 



Description 

Logging 

Treated wood products 

Paperboard 



Employment 

40 
9 
1 



NEW AND EXPANDED MANUFACTURERS 
1969-1974 

NEW 

Olin Corporation 1969 

Posey Seafood & Crab Shelling Company 1970 

Wakulla Wood Products 1973 

EXPANDED 
None 

OTHER MAJOR EMPLOYMENT 

As of November, 1974, the total employment in Wakulla County was estimated at 
2,653. This figure includes manufacturing employment of 380 persons. Other major employ- 
ment categories include construction with 40 persons; wholesale and retail trade with 340 
persons; service and other wage and salary workers with 1,210 persons; and government 
with 680 persons. 



LABOR SUPPLY 

The Division of Economic Development defines the primary labor supply area for 
Crawfordville to be that territory encompassed within a 30-mile radius of the community 
and/or its industrial districts. Within this area, potential labor supply consists of the unem- 
ployed, the underemployed, recent high school graduates, and those entering the job mar- 
ket for the first time. 

Unemployment 

Crawfordville is the county seat in Wakulla County. The labor supply area includes 
portions of Franklin, Gadsden, Leon, and Liberty counties. A summary of the unemployment 
in these counties as of March, 1975, is presented below. The Division does not, however, as- 
sume that all these unemployed would commute to Wakulla County. 

County Total Unemployment Unemployment Rate 

Wakulla 205 5.8 

Franklin 354 17.8 

Gadsden 1,779 12.9 

Leon 4,300 7.4 

Liberty 155 14.9 



LABOR DRAWING AREA 



.an, V/'T*LL*HASSlt / I ^' ■ ' """'^ *'> 

^, \ NORTMCAST / \j MONT ic a LO NOM tM 



VljnlKell* 




SCALE 



Alabama I 'Jvof^i 



10 

H M H H H I- 



10 



20 



30 

3Z 



40 MILES 

~1 




Population, Labor Drawing Area (Approximate 30-mile radius) 



COUNTY 
County 
Subdivision 

Wakulla 
Franklin 
Gadsden 

Quincy South 

Leon 
Tallahassee 
Tallahassee S.E. 
Tallahassee S.W. 

Liberty 
East Liberty 

TOTAL 











.Percent 


Percent 








Non 


Under 


65 or 


Population 


Male 


Female 


White 


18 


Over 


6,308 


3,098 


3,210 


1,532 


37.5 


10.6 


7,065 


3,429 


3,636 


1,323 


34.7 


15.3 



12,351 



5,826 



6,525 



7,432 



41.4 



9.0 



86,017 


41,115 


44,902 


21,165 


30.2 


5.3 


2,748 


1,402 


1,346 


702 


40.5 


6.7 


2,607 


1.316 


1,291 


161 


36.4 


5.4 


1,213 


622 


591 


39 


36.1 


9.4 


118,309 


56,808 


61,501 


32,354 


32.5 


6.6 



Population Trends in Wakulla and Contiguous Counties^ 

Estimated 
County 
Wakulla 
Franklin 
Gadsden 
Leon 

Liberty 
TOTAL 



Projected 



1960 


1970 


1973 


1975 


1980 


5,257 


6,308 


7,436 


8,100 


9,200 


6,576 


7,065 


7,497 


7,700 


8,000 


41 ,989 


39,184 


38,968 


39,300 


40,500 


74,225 


103,047 


122,901 


133,200 


152,900 


3,138 


3,379 


3,748 


3,900 


4.000 


131,185 


158,983 


180,550 


192,200 


214,600 



UNIONS 

The United Steelworkers of America, a member of the American Federation of Labor, 
represents some workers in Wakulla County. 



^U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, General Population Characteristics of Florida, 1970, 

Census of the Population. 
^Population figures are from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Census, publications. Estimates and 

protections of the population are from the University of Florida, Bureau of Business and Economic Research. 



TRANSPORTATION 

RAILROADS 

Railroad service is not available in Crawfordville. The Seaboard Coast Line Railroad 
Company provides service to Wakulla County, however, with a track running south from 
Tallahassee through the center of the county to St. Marks. The railroad provides once a day 
service to St. Marks at the present time. Carload shipments will normally reach Atlanta in two 
to four days, New Orleans in two to four days, and New York and Chicago in four to six days. 

Piggyback service is available m Tallahassee. 19 miles north of St. Marks. 



TRUCK LINES 

There are no truck terminals in Wakulla County. A number of truck lines provide serv- 
ices to the county from terminals in Tallahassee. MR&R Trucking Company and Mercury 
Motor Express, Inc., are predominate in the county. Truckload shipments normally reach 
Atlanta in one to two days, Chicago and New York in four to six days, and the west coast in 
seven to ten days. 

The nearest United Parcel Service (UPS) terminal is located in Tallahassee. Principal 
routes used for motor freight are U.S. Highways 98 and 319. 

AVIATION 

Tallahassee Municipal Airport, 22 miles north, provides the nearest air service for 
Crawfordville. Eastern, National, and Southern airlines provide daily scheduled passenger 
flights. Air freight service is available. 

' Wakulla County Airport, located in Panacea, is the only airport in the county. The air- 
port has a 2,500 by 200 foot, turf landing strip. No services are available.^ 



BUS SERVICES 

Trailways Bus Lines operates two buses daily through Crawfordville, one westbound 
and one to Tallahassee. All buses handle freight on a limited basis. 



PORTS 

'The only commercial port in Wakulla County is found at St. Marks. This inland port is 
connected to the Gulf of Mexico by an improved channel which follows the Wakulla and St. 
Marks rivers. Port facilities are primarily oriented toward petroleum-handling, and other 
capabilities are minimal. The controlling depth is 12 feet. 

Another shallow port area is located at Panacea, but no commercial facilities are 
available., 



ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 

SUPPORT 



SITES 

There are no developed, publicly-owned industrial sites in Wakulla County. A sub- 
stantial amount of undeveloped land suitable for industrial use, however, is available in the 
county. 



INDUSTRIAL SERVICES 

Three general contractors, one electrical contractor, one mechanical contractor, and 
one plumbing contractor are located in Wakulla County. Electric motor repair, welding serv- 
ices, and well drilling services are also available. In addition, all supportive industrial services 
are available in Tallahassee and do work in Wakulla County. 



INDUSTRIAL FINANCING 

Industrial revenue bonds have never been used in Wakulla County. The county com- 
mission has indicated a willingness, however, to validate such bonds for qualified prospects 
if revenue bond financing is desirable. 



BANKING 

Commercial Banking 

The Wakulla County State Bank was opened on October 1, 1974, in Crawfordville. 
Their financial position as of January 31, 1975, includes capital of $233,000, $70,500 in sur- 
plus, and Si .689.217 in deposits. The bank is insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corpo- 
ration (FDIC), and is affiliated with banks in Jacksonville and Tallahassee. 

COMMUNICATIONS 

Telephone 

Central Telephone Company of Florida serves all of Wakulla County. In 1974 the com- 
pany handled 74,792 toll messages from the county. The number of stations has increased 
from 1 ,319 in 1969 to 3.010 in 1974. It is estimated that the number of stations will reach 3,301 
by 1974 and 4,486 by 1980. 

System investment in the past five years (1970 through 1974) has totaled $2,361,005. No 
projection of future system investment has been made by the company. 



Telegraph 

Telegraph services are available from Western Union in Tallahassee. The main office is 
open Monday through Friday, 7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.. and Saturday, 7:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. A 
branch office is located at the Holiday Inn in Tallahassee, and is open from 7:00 a.m. to mid- 
night every day. 



ACCOMMODATIONS 

There are ten motels and one hotel in Wakulla County which provide a total of 178 
accommodation units. There are nineteen restaurants v^/ith a total estimated seating capa- 
city of 1,404. 

The VFW Meeting Hall, the Livestock Pavilion, a number of churches, and some res- 
taurants have facilities for meetings and banquets. 



UTILITIES 



ELECTRIC POWER 

Florida Power Corporation provides electric power for most of Wakulla County. Dis- 
tribution voltage in the county is 12.47 KV. Three phase power is available if required. 

Those portions of the county not served by Florida Power Corporation are served by 
Talquin Electric Cooperative, Inc., 

Florida Power Corporation 
Monthly Rates^ 
Schedule C1-1 



Basic Rate Load Factor Rate 

@ $2.00 None 

@ .0473 per kwh None 

@ .0423 per kwh None 

@ .0339 per kwh $.0148 per kwh 

@ .0303 per kwh .0148 per kwh 

@ .0240 per kwh .0118 per kwh 

@ .0171 per kwh .0087 per kwh 

All additional kwh @ .0148 per kwh .0078 per kwh 

Where billing demand is not measured, the Basic Rate shall apply to the total kwh use. 
Where billing demand is measured, the Basic Rate shall apply to kwh use equal to or less 
than 250 times the billing demand. Remaining kwh, if any, will be billed under the Load Fac- 
tor Rate, continuing in the block at the point where billing under the Basic Rate stopped. 
Such block must be completed before proceeding to the next lower priced block under the 
Load Factor Rate. 

Mini mum Monthly Bill 

When demand is not measured, the minimum monthly bill shall be two dollars ($2.00). 
Where demand is measured, the minimum monthly bill shall be $1.25 per kw of billing demand 
but for not less than 4 kw. 

Where special equipment to serve the customer is required, the Company may require 
a specified minimum charge. 

Determinati on of Demand 

When demand is measured, the billing demand shall be the highest 30-minute kw 
demand established during the billing period but not less than 4 kw. 



Rate Pel 


r Month 




First 


20 


kwh 


Next 


130 


kwh 


Next 


350 


kwh 


Next 


1,000 


kwh 


Next 


2,500 


kwh 


Next 


31,000 


kwh 


Next 115,000 


kwh 



^Specific application of services may be verified with the Crawfordville office of Florida Power Corporation. 



Power Facto r 

Where the customer is found to have a power factor of less than 85 percent, the Com- 
pany may, at its option, measure the monthly demand in kva, in which case the billing demand 
shall be 85 percent of the measured kva. 

Fuel Adjustment Charges 

The above rates are subject to a variable fuel adjustment charge set by the utility 
company. This charge reflects the increased cost of fuel and is set on a monthly basis. 



NATURAL GAS 

Natural gas is not currently available to the public in Wakulla County. A gas trans- 
mission line has been placed in the county for the use of a power generation plant. Whether 
or not their excess capacity can be utilized has not been determined. 



L. P. GAS 

/ 

L. P. gas in Wakulla County is distributed by Wakulla L. P. Gas, Inc., in Crawfordville. 

This company currently has a storage capacity of 20,000 gallons. 



FUEL OIL 



Fuel Oil is available from the following firms in Wakulla County: 

Gulf Oil Company 
Standard Oil Company 
Tenneco Oil Company 
Turner Oil Company 

Rates are subject to individual contract negotiation. 



WATER 

Municipal Water System 

Four communities in the county maintain municipal water systems — Crawfordville, 
Panacea, Sopchoppy, and St. Marks. In addition, the unincorporated areas of Spring Creek 
and Shell Point have water systems provided by Talquin Electric Cooperative, Inc. / 

Crawfordville 

^ Crawfordville's wells have a pumping capacity of 288,000 gallons during a 24-hour 
day. Current usage averages 19,000 gallons daily. There is no elevated storage/ 



10 



Panacea 

Panacea's well system has a pumping capacity of approximately 504,000 gallons per 
24-hour day with current usage of approximately 83,000 gallons per day. The town has an 
elevated storage capacity of 100,000 gallons. 

Sopchoppy 

Sopchoppy's water supply is obtained from deep wells which have a maximum pump- 
ing capacity of 200 gallons per minute or 288,000 gallons in a 24-hour day. Current usage is 
40,000 gallons per 24-hour day, and the city maintains an elevated storage capacity of 75,000 
gallons. 

St. Marks 

The wells supplying the City of St. Marks have a maximum pumping capacity of more 
than 500,000 gallons in a 24-hour day. Current usage averages 110,000 gallons per 24-hour 
day. The city maintains 100,000 gallons of elevated storage. 

Chemical Analysis^ 

Since in all cases the water supplied is untreated, the chemical composition is ap- 
proximately the same for all areas. 

(Milligrams per liter, except as indicated) 
Water: Raw 

Analysis By: U. S. Geological Survey Collection Date: 1-25-71 
Sampling Point: Well B-13 

Silica (Si02) 9.3 Noncarbonate hard- 
Calcium (Ca) 45 nessasCaCO^ 2 
Magnesium (Mg) 3.3 Alkalinity as CaCOs 125 
Sodium (Na) 3.7 Strontium (Sr) .22 
Potassium (K) .6 Specific conductance 
Bicarbonate (HCO3) 150 (micromhos at 25 C) 270 
Sulfate (SO4) 9.6 Dissolved solid (residue 
Chloride (CI) 6.0 at 180 C) 164 
Fluoride (F) .2 Temperature (X) 22 
Nitrate (NO3) .0 Color (Pt-Co units) 
Nitrite (NO2) .01 pH (units) 8.3 
Hardness as CaCO^ 127 



^Public Water Supplies of Selected Municipalities in Florida, 1970. US Geological Survey and Florida Depart- 
ment of Natural Resources, 

11 



Monthly Rates^ 



Crawfordville 

First 2,000 gallons (minimum) 

2,000- 5,000 gallons 

5,000- 10,000 gallons 
10,000-50,000 gallons 
50,000 gallons or more 



$3.50 

.80 per 1,000 gallons 
.70 per 1,000 gallons 
.30 per 1,000 gallons 
.20 per 1,000 gallons 



Panacea 






First 


4,000 gallons 


(minimum 


Next 


2,000 gallons 




Next 


4,000 gallons 





Next 10,000 gallons 

Over 20,000 gallons 



$5.25 

.85 per 1,000 gallons 
.70 per 1,000 gallons 
.60 per 1,000 gallons 
.50 per 1,000 gallons 



Sopchoppy 



Residenti; 


al 




First 


2,500 gallons 


(minimum 


Next 


3,000 gallons 




Next 


4,000 gallons 




Next 


10,000 gallons 




All Over 


2p,000 gallons 




Industrial 






St. Marks 







Residential 

First 
All over 



3,000 gallons (minimum) 
3.000 gallons 



$3.50 

.90 per 1,000 gallons 
.75 per 1,000 gallons 
.50 per 1,000 gallons 
.40 per 1,000 gallons 

.40 per 1,000 gallons 



$6.00 

.75 per 1,000 gallons 



Industrial 

First 
All over 



6,000 gallons (minimum) 
6,000 gallons 



$12.00 

.75 per 1,000 gallons 



'Additional information about water rates and billing practices may be obtained at ttie offices of tfie water de- 
partments of each community. 



12 



SEWERS 

/ 
There are no municipal sewage treatment facilities in Wakulla County. 

REFUSE COLLECTION 

The cities of Sopchoppy and St. Marks provide municipal refuse collection. Both 
cities collect twice per week. Disposal is made at the county's sanitary landfill. 
Environmental certification of this landfill is now under consideration. 

Monthly Rates^ 

Sopchoppy 

Residential $3.00 per month 

Commercial $3.00 per month 

St. Marks 

Residential $1.00 per month 

Commercial $2.00 per month 



'Additional information about refuse collection rates and billing practices may be obtained at the city tiall of the 
individual city. 

13 



GOVERNMENT SERVICES 



GOVERNMENT 

Wakulla County is governed by five commissioners who are elected for four-year terms 
on a staggered basis. Elections are held every tv^o years. A chairman is elected for a one-year 
term by the commission. Meetings are held on the first Monday following the first day of each 
month and the first Wednesday after the fifteenth day of each month. 

St. Marks' city government consists of five councilmen who are elected for two-year, 
staggered terms; a mayor who is elected for a two-year term: and a city manager who is ap- 
pointed by the council. Their meetings are held on the second and fourth Tuesday of each 
month. 

The City of Sopchoppy has a mayor and five councilmen. The mayor is elected for a 
two-year term and the councilmen are elected for two-year, staggered terms. Meetings are 
held on the first Tuesday of each month. 



TAXES 

In 1974 the citizens of Wakulla County were taxed at a rate of $14.76 per $1,000 of 
assessed valuation. This includes $7.36 for general county purposes and $7.40 for schools. 

The City of St. Marks is the only municipality to levy taxes. In 1974 the taxes in St. 
Marks were based on a rate of $5.34 per $1,000 of assessed valuation. 



FINANCE 

Wakulla County 

In Fiscal Year 1973, Wakulla County had total receipts from all sources of $176.48 per 
capita while total expenditures per capita were $175.89. The table below presents a four-year 
record of selected receipts and disbursements of Wakulla County. 



Total Revenue 
Local Tax Revenue^ 
Utility Sales Revenue^ 
Intergovernmental Revenue 

Federal 

State 
Total Expenditures 

Capital Outlay 

Operating and Other 
General Government 
Police 

'Local tax revenue includes property tax, utility service tax. building and zoning permit fees, franchise fees, etc. 
^Utility sales revenue includes revenue from water, sewage, gas. and electric, as well as any otfier utility oper- 
ation in wtiicfi a city or county might be engaged. 

14 



1973 


1972 


1971 


1970 


$1,312,361 


$1,025,397 


$ 809,187 


$ 729,082 


264,567 


204,425 


159,963 


110,354 


924,455 


764,323 


586,040 


547,908 


186,082 


65,031 


21,085 


42,542 


738,373 


699,292 


564,955 


505,366 


1,300,604 


939,665 


798,915 


705,834 


279,640 


40,682 


79,299 


32,799 


1,020,964 


898,983 


719,616 


673,035 


428,696 


240,670 


217,583 


164,302 


109,254 


116,298 


87,711 


80,442 



Fire 

Streets and Highways 
Parks and Recreation 
Health and Hospitals 
interest on Debt 
Cash and Investment 



1973 

6,187 
251,229 

143,939 

246,963 



(Dollars) 
1972 1971 



4,404 
171,592 

31,088 

201,213 



4,404 
105,135 

27,596 

115,482 



1970 

5,604 
110,950 

23,492 

105,210 



Cities of Sopchoppy and St. Marks 

In Fiscal Year 1973, the City of Sopchoppy had revenues of $108.08 per capita and ex- 
penditures of $41.11 per capita. The City of St. Marks had revenues of $162.38 per capita and 
expenditures of $96.54 per capita for the same period. Due to a change in reporting methods, 
no comparison is possible between 1973 and other years. Because of its unincorporated 
status, Crawfordville does not prepare a formalized budget. 



Total Revenue 
Local Tax Revenue^ 
Utility Sales Revenue^ 
Intergovernmental Revenue 

Federal 

State 

Total Expenditures 
Capital Outlay 
Operating and Other 

General Government 

Police 

Fire 

Streets and Highways 

Parks and Recreation 

Health and Hospital 

Interest on Debt 

Cash and Investment 



Dpchoppy 


St. Marks 


1973 


1973 


$54,689 


$65,115 


5,397 


19,770 


4,108 


6,i72 


36,094 


28,218 


7,525 


6,248 


28,569 


21,970 


20,802 


38,713 


2,292 


— 


18,510 


38,713 


4,170 


17,822 


7,887 


— 


227 


— 



30 

567 
6,068 



66 



13,193 
55,724 



'Local tax revenue includes property tax. utility service tax, building and zoning permit fees, franchise fees^ etc. 
^Utility sales revenue includes revenue from water, sewage, gas, and electric, as well as any other utility oper- 
ation in which a city or county might be engaged. 



15 



FIRE PROTECTION 

There are presently nine volunteer fire departments in Wakulla County. Two, St. 
Marks and Sopchoppy, are tax supported. The other seven are supported primarily through 
community contribution. This group includes Crawfordville, Medart, Panacea, Wakulla, 
Ochlockonee Bay, Spring Creek, and Smith Creek. All but the latter two of these units are 
equipped for fire fighting. The National Board of Fire Underwriters rates all communities, 
with the exception of Sopchoppy, as NB 10. Sopchoppy has a rating of NB 9. 

Olin Corporation has its own fire equipment for use on its corporate property. 



POLICE PROTECTION 

The cities of Sopchoppy and St. Marks provide municipal police protection v\/ithin 
their city limits. Each of these police forces has two full-time officers and one radio equipped 
car. They are radio dispatched from the county sheriff's office. 

The Wakulla County Sheriff's Department has a staff of five deputies in addition to the 
sheriff. Five fully equipped vehicles and one staff automobile are utilized in the department's 
operations. The sheriff's department provides jail service and radio dispatching for the 
county. 

The highway patrol maintains two troopers in the county, providing 16-hour a day ac- 
tive service. However, these officers are on call on a 24-hour a day basis. 



AMBULANCE SERVICE 

Ambulance service is provided by Wakulla County. Two fully equipped vehicles are 
utilized to provide 24-hour service. The ambulances are staffed by two full-time and one 
part-time emergency medical technicians. The ambulances operate from Crawfordville. 



PLANNING AND ZONING 

There are currently no zoning ordinances in effect in Wakulla County. Zoning is now 
under consideration and a subdivision ordinance has been adopted by the county. Flood 
plain ordinances also have been adopted. 

The county has established a planning council whose members are appointed by the 
county commission. The council has five members and meets on the first Monday of each 
month. A Wakulla County Development Plan was published in June, 1974, and adopted in 
December, 1974, by the county commission. 



CONSTRUCTION CODES 

" Wakulla County has adopted the Southern Standard Building Code as well as the 
Plumbing and Electrical Codes. St. Marks and Sopchoppy, the county's incorporated areas, 
have chosen to be included in the county's code operations. 



16 



COMMUNITY ASSETS 

EDUCATION 

Wakulla County operates one school system that Includes four campuses throughout 
the countyJ The current expense per pupil based on average daily attendance (ADA) for the 
1972-73 school year was $1,058.00. The minimum required local contribution per pupil based 
on ADA was $69.18. Total revenue from all sources was $1,286.92 per pupil based on ADA 
with $165.76 per pupil collected from local sources. ^ Total revenue per pupil based on ADA 
for the state as a whole was $942.24. 

Instructional salaries in Wakulla County on a ten month basis range from a minimum 
of $7,000 for Rank III to a maximum of $15,990 for Rank I. Twenty years are required to reach 
the maximum salary. 

Tallahassee Community College, located 25 miles north of Crawfordville, offers a two- 
year associate degree program with an approximate enrollment of 2,600 students. The college 
also offers non-credit, short courses of all types. 

Florida State University, also located in Tallahassee, is a four-year university with 
postgraduate programs and has an approximate enrollment of 21 ,037. 

Vocational/technical education in Wakulla County is provided by the Wakulla County 
School System and Tallahassee Community College, and Lewis M. Lively Area Vocational- 
Technical Center in Tallahassee. 

WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL SYSTEM 



SCHOOL 

Crawfordville Elementary 
Shadeville Elementary 
Sopchoppy Elementary 
Wakulla High School 



LOCATION 

Crawfordville 

Crawfordville 

Sopchoppy 

Crawfordville 



GRADES 

K-6 

K-6 

K-6 
7-12 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

Average daily attendance (K-12) 1972-73 
Total full-time classroom teachers (K-12) 
Non-exempt assessed valuation (county tax base) 
Total revenue receipts, all sources 
Total current expense, all funds 



1,834 

104 

$24,936,000 

$ 2,360,210 

$ 1,940,978 



PUPIL DATA 

Number of high school graduates, 1972-73 

Percent of 1973 high school graduates entering college 

Percent of 1973 high school graduates entering technical training 



86 
24.42 
11.63 



INSTRUCTIONAL PERSONNEL 

Total full-time instructional personnel, 1972-73 124 

Average pupils per teacher (1-12) based on average daily attendance, 1972-73 18.79 

^At certain campus locations, elementary, middle, and high school facilities are adjacent to each other. 
^Profiles of Florida School Districts, Florida Department of Education, Tallahassee, 1974. 



17 



FISCAL DATA 

Percent of total revenue from local sources, 1972-73 12.88 

Percent of current expense for instruction, 1972-73 64.97 



DAY CARE CENTERS 

Tfiere are no licensed day care centers in Wakulla County. Private facilities for ap- 
proximately 30 children are available in Crawfordville. 



LIBRARY 

The Wakulla County Library is sponsored by Wakulla County by contract with the 
Leon County Public Library. The library maintains 4,000 titles on a rotating basis with the 
Leon County Library. In addition, bookmobile service is provided at 14 locations throughout 
the county on a two-week cycle. 



MEDICAL AND HOSPITAL FACILITIES 

Hospitals 

There is no hospital in Wakulla County. The nearest hospital is located in Tallahas- 
see, 25 miles north of Crawfordville. This hospital has intensive care, cardiac care, and 
most facilities found in large medical complexes. Tallahassee Memorial Hospital has over 
300 beds. 

Physicians and Dentists 

Three doctors maintain private practices in Wakulla County. A dentist has recently 
established a practice in the county. 

Health Department 

Wakulla County maintains health clinics in Crawfordville and Sopchoppy. The main 
clinic is located in Crawfordville and provides services Monday through Friday. The Sop- 
choppy clinic is open only on Thursday mornings. The staff is composed of one doctor (two 
days per week), two full-time and one part-time registered nurses, a sanitarian, two social 
workers (one day per week), an alcoholic counselor, one psychologist (one day per month), 
and one vocational rehabilitation worker (one morning per week). 

Clinics and services available through the health department include vision and 
hearing testing, dental care, tuberculin testing, immunizations, V.D., prenatal, alcoholic re- 
habilitation, nutrition, cardiovascular screening, vocational rehabilitation, psychiatric, birth 
control, pregnancy testing, family planning, and some laboratory services. 



18 



RECREATION 

Wakulla County has just established a formal recreation program for its residents. It 
will be administered by a part-time director who has been given a budget of $17,000. A na- 
tional forest, a state park, and a number of wildlife management areas are available for 
recreational use. In addition, many miles of coastline with excellent fishing and water sport 
potential exist in the county. 



CLIMATE 

The following data are averages recorded at the St. Marks weather station. 

During 19 days per year, the temperature is less than or equal to 32 degrees for some 
portion of the 24-hour period. During 94 days per year, the temperature equals or exceeds 
90 degrees for some portion of the 24-hour period. 

During 66 days per year precipitation equals or exceeds 0.10 inch, while during 32 
days per year, precipitation equals or exceeds 0.50 inch. Average annual rainfall is 56.33 
inches. 



Temperatures 



MONTH HIGH MEAN 

Jan 81 53.1 

Feb 80 56.3 

Mar 87 60.4 

Apr 93 67.5 

May 102 74.8 

Jun 103 80.2 

Jul 102 81.9 

Aug 102 81.9 

Sep 96 78.9 

Oct 95 70.5 

Nov 85 60.3 

Dec 78 53.7 

Annual 10-year Record 103 68.3 17 56.33 





AVERAGE 




MONTHLY 


ow 


RAINFALL 


19 


2.55 


17 


4.13 


26 


4.69 


38 


5.05 


43 


3.75 


54 


7.26 


64 


6.48 


62 


6.35 


56 


7.07 


30 


3.68 


23 


2.74 


20 


2.58 



19 



HOUSING 

In July, 1973, Wakulla County was estimated to have 3,833 housing units, of which 4.8 
percent were multi-familyJ Total housing units increased at a rate of 4.21 percent per year 
in the period 1960/1970 and at a rate of 12.50 percent per year in the period 1970/1973. 

The availability of rental housing and houses in Wakulla County is limited. While little 
construction is currently underway in the county, new homes usually range in price from 
$18,000 to $40,000 with an average of $28,000. 

Rental housing is available in the form of apartments in private homes, mobile homes, 
and houses. Apartments are generally priced at $70 to $100 per month, with older homes 
renting for $80 to $100 a month and new homes for $150 to $225 per month. 

CHURCHES 

Five denominations hold religious services in Wakulla County. 

Assembly of God 

Baptist 

Congregational Holiness 

Methodist 

Seventh Day Adventist 

Most other denominations, including Roman Catholic, Episcopalian, Jewish and Greek 
Orthodox, hold religious services in Tallahassee. 



INCOME 

A reliable estimate of 1973 effective buying income in Wakulla County indicates $2,579 
per capita and $5,772 median household income. ^ 



NEWSPAPERS 

The Wakulla County News is published in Crawfordville on a weekly basis and has a 
circulation of 3,500. In addition, daily newspapers from Tallahassee and Jacksonville are 
available in the county. 

RADIO AND TELEVISION 

There are no radio or television stations in Wakulla County. County residents do re- 
ceive a number of radio stations and all three major television networks from nearby com- 
munities. Cable television is not available. 



'University of Florida, College of Business Administration, Division of Population Studies. 
'^1974 Sales Management Survey of Buying Power; further reproduction is forbidden. 



20 



RAW MATERIALS 

AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS 

Peanuts, corn, honey, cattle, and hogs are the principal agricultural products pro- 
duced on Wakulla County's 125 farms. Approximately 600 acres are planted in peanuts and 
1,200 acres in corn. The value of these crops are estimated to be $230,000 and $140,000 re- 
spectively. There are approximately 3,500 bee hives in the county with an output valued at 
$100,000. Over 2,500 head of cattle worth $250,000 and 2,000 hogs valued at $80,000 are 
raised in the county. The total value of all agricultural products sold is estimated by county 
agriculture experts to be in excess of $800,000. 

FOREST RESOURCES 

Wakulla County had 88 percent (348,600 acres) of its 395,800 acres in commercial 
forest land in 1969 with a net volume of growing stock of 263.2 million cubic feet and 
737.5 million board feet of sawtimber. 



Species 

Pine 

Other softwood 

Soft hardwood 

Hard hardwood 

TOTAL 

SOURCE: Herbert A. Knight, Forest Statistics for Northwest Florida, 1969, Southeast Forest Experiment Station, 
USDA Forest Service Resource Bulletin, SE-14. 



MINERALS^ 

Mineral production in Wakulla County is limited to gravel and industrial sand. The 
dollar value of production is withheld to avoid disclosing individual company confidential 
data. 



MARINE PRODUCTS^ 

Landings of fish, shellfish, and other marine products in Wakulla County in 1973 had 
a total value of $671,469 and a total weight of 5,503,574 pounds. Finfish landings, primarily 
mullet, were valued at $256,234; and shellfish landings, primarily blue crab, were valued at 
$415,235. 



^Minerals Yearbook, 1972, Area Reports: Domestic, U.S. Department of the Interior. 

^Summary of Florida Commercial Marine Landings, 1973, Florida Department of Natural Resources. 



21 



Sawtimber 


Gi 


rowing Stock 


Million Board Feet 


Mill 


ion Cubic Feet 


475.6 




164.8 


22.7 




6.5 


112.6 




48.6 


126.6 




43.3 


737.5 




263.2 



INDEX 



Accommodations 8 

Agricultural Products 21 

Ambulance Service 16 

Aviation 6 

Banking 7 

Basic Location Factors . 1 

Bus Service 6 

Churches 20 

Climate 19 

Communications 17 

Community Assets 17 

Construction Codes 16 

Day Care Centers 18 

Economic Development Support 7 

Education 7 

Electric Power 9 

Employment, Manufacturing 1 

Employment, Other Major 3 

Finance, Cities of Sopchoppy and St. Marks 15 

Finance, Wakulla County 14 

Financing, Industrial 7 

Fire Protection 16 

Forest Resources 21 

Fuel Oil 10 

Government 14 

Government Services 14 

Health Department 18 

Hospitals 18 

Housing 20 

Income 20 

Labor Supply 3 

Library 18 

L. P. Gas 10 

Manufacturers, Existing 2 

Manufacturers, New and Expanded 3 

Marine Products 21 

Medical and Hospital Facilities 18 

Minerals 21 

Natural Gas 10 

Newspapers 20 

Physicians and Dentists 18 

Planning and Zoning 16 

Police Protection 16 

Population, Labor Drawing Area 5 

Population Projections 1 

Population Trends in Wakulla and Contiguous Counties 5 

Ports 6 

Radio and Television 20 

Railroads 6 

Raw Materials 22 

Recreation 19 

Refuse Collection 13 

Services, Industrial 7 

Sewers 13 

Sites 7 

Taxes 14 

Telegraph 8 

Telephone 7 

Television (See Radio and Television) 20 

Transportation 6 

Truck Lines 6 

Unemployment 3 

Unions 5 

Utilities 9 

Water, Municipal 10 

Zoning (See Planning and Zoning) 16 



*hiF4^ 




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